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Agave: the new star plant of our haircare products!

Straight from Mexico, Agave is great for your hair: here’s why.

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Native to Mexico and capable of spanning 6.5 feet, Blue Agave owes its name to the color of its leaves. This plant is used in both food and cosmetics. At Yves Rocher, we use Agave as an active ingredient, particularly in our haircare line. Want to learn more about this plant? Here we explain how we harvest it and more.

Blue Agave identity sheet  

We source our Blue Agave fructans from Mexico, their native land. Suited to arid and semi-arid climates, Agave possesses the ability to build up energy reserves in its pulpy heart in the form of sugars, called fructans. The time between planting and harvesting can span anywhere between 8 to 12 years, a period farmers take care of the crop to promote its growth. During this stage, the “heart of the plant” slowly loads up with fructans, which facilitate its development, growth, and tolerance to extreme weather conditions.
When the concentration of fructans is at its maximum, the leaves are removed and the center, called the “piña” (which means “pineapple” in Spanish, due to its resemblance to the fruit), is harvested in order to extract the fructans.

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What benefits does it have in cosmetics?

Our Botanical Beauty researchers have unlocked the secret of Agave Tequilana's vast store of fructans, which are a powerful source of energy for the plant. Agave fructans have never been used before as an active cosmetic ingredient. They work where the hair gets all its strength: right in the scalp itself. The roots are better nourished and the hair grows in stronger and more beautiful.  Luckily for you, this active ingredient is present in all of our haircare products!

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 Did you know? 

The most widespread and iconic use of this plant is in the production of tequila. After growing for about 12 years, the succulent leaves are removed from the Agave Tequilana (for tequila) or Agave Angustifolia (for mescal) plants, and the heart (the piña) is retrieved. After oven drying for a few days, the heart is crushed to extract the juice, which is then fermented. This alcoholic beverage, called “pulque” or “maguey,” produces the tequila typical of Mexico once distilled.
Agave Tequilana is also used to produce a syrup called Agave nectar. Derived from a long reduction process involving the aguamiel (the sap of the plant), this nectar is rich in fructose and used as a food substitute for refined sugar.

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Now that you know all about Agave, which shampoo are you going to choose? Tell us in the comments!

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